Las Cruces Magazine

Fall/Winter 2016-2017

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Fall/Winter Edition I 35 Styrofoam cup, placed in the center of a square paper bowl and surrounded by Tostitos chips. Chorreado means drizzled, and true to form, the corn and tostadas are covered in a thick layer of nacho cheese, shredded Muenster cheese, and sour cream, plus a helping of Valentina sauce. The nachos portion is also heavily sprinkled with more white corn. You might be momentarily taken aback when you first lay eyes on this imaginative spin, not quite knowing where to start. The answer is: anywhere you want. The best part, I thought, is the corn/cheese/Tostitos combination, which melds tons of flavor with that satisfying crunch. It doesn't take a nachos fanatic to appreciate the ingenuity. "We try to maintain the natural flavor of the corn in our dish," notes owner Daniella Sanchez who credits her sister and co-owner, Naoemi, for the recipe. She also notes that the popularity of corn can partially be attributed to its versatility in numerous dishes. It's fitting that Deleite's take on it is so outside the box, and it's a must-try choice for anyone who thinks they've tasted every possible corn recipe. Deleite 1400 S. Solano Dr. 575-521-6243 An Old-School Favorite With Surprising Depth Emilio's Fresh Snacks To round out our tour, we stopped at Emilio's Fresh Snacks, a food truck that takes elote en vaso back to its roots. Here, you select your choice of yellow or white corn and pick from an assortment of sizes. Food truck owner Emilio Gutierrez prides himself on working with the freshest ingredients possible. He explains that he has a different method of preparation, depending on either yellow or white corn. Sometimes he'll even get requests to combine the two types. The sweeter yellow variety is combined with Monterey Jack cheese, which melts into the corn, and lime juice, creating a thick, stew-like texture that begs to be slurped. The white corn recipe contains mozzarella cheese, giving it a somewhat saltier flavor. Emilio's no-fuss recipes are simple, yet satisfying and, on a personal level, reminded me of the humble Mexican delicacy I grew up eating. What makes the dining experience even more fascinating is watching him quickly whip up his food creations inside the compact space. Once a journalist in Juarez, Emilio has no formal training in the culinary arts, but says he has spent much of his life in the kitchen cooking for family and friends. "I started cooking out of necessity," he says. "I've had my food truck for three years. I think people like that I put my heart into it. I enjoy cooking. I think they also appreciate that I value quality ingredients." When I asked Emilio why he thinks corn is such an integral food in our area, he replied that it's a fundamental part of our background. "It's a basic, essential part of our Mexican culture," he answers. "I prepare my dishes as if I was going to eat them myself. To be honest, I keep it simple and try to stick to the basics. If people like it, they'll ask for more." Emilio's Fresh Snacks Call for location. 575-650-3521 An Old-School Favorite With To round out our tour, we stopped at roots. Here, you select your choice of yellow or white corn and pick from an assortment of sizes. Food truck owner working with the freshest ingredients depending on either yellow or white corn. Sometimes he'll even get requests combined with Monterey Jack cheese, Emilio's Fresh Snacks Call for location. 575-650-3521

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